Grenivík. Hiking in northern Iceland

Grenivík is a small fishing village of about 300 inhabitants located in the Eyjafjörður fjord in northern Iceland. Its main activity remains fishing, but the village also has a small pharmaceutical industry. Given its size and geographical location, Grenivík is a quiet and uncrowded village, but the surrounding countryside is well known for its hiking trails. From Grenivík you can reach the Flateyjarskagi Peninsula.

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Mountain Kaldbakur, 1173 meters in height, is right next to the village and will delight fans of walking, as there are several paths leading to the top. An easier alternative is the path that leads to Þengilhöfði, a small mountain 260 meters high just south of Grenivík. For more challenging alternatives you can go to the top of the Blámannshattur and Laufáshnjúkur mountains that are in the area. The ancient sites of Fjörðurnar and Látraströnd, a series of fjords in the region, are also good places to walk, and are becoming more and more popular with travellers looking for a bit of peace away from the most popular tourist sites. You can avail of the snow cat services of Kaldbasferðir to go to the top of the Kalbakur mountain, and those of Fjörðungar to walk around Fjörðurnar and Látraströnd.

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Near the village of Grenivík, the historic site of Laufás is open to travellers to learn about the Icelandic nineteenth-century lifestyle. Several small peat houses have been preserved and transformed into a museum. Laufás also has a beautiful little Icelandic chapel, built in 1865.

Other activities are available in the region; Pólar Hestar organises horseback excursions from Grýtubakki; You can go fishing in the rivers Fnjóská and Fjarðará in the Hvalvatnsfjörður Fjord. Every year in July, you can attend Grenivíkurgleðin, a series of outdoor concerts. The Museum of Fishing is open every day from the 15th of June to the 15th of August and will introduce you to the history of the region. Jónsabúð, the village shop, serves as a petrol station, café, restaurant and tourist office. Grenivík also has a campsite, a Hleskógar guesthouse and, of course, a municipal swimming pool.

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If you arrive from Akureyri, go east and follow Route 1 for about fifteen kilometres and then turn left onto Route 83; Grenivík is about 20 kilometres from this intersection. If you are coming from the east (Mývatn), turn at the junction of roads 1 and 835, about fifteen kilometres after the Goðafoss waterfall.

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Grenivík. Hiking in northern Iceland