Strange architecture in Iceland! - What to see in Iceland

Hallgrímskirkja (73 meters high) is the tallest church in Iceland and is located in central Reykjavik. The architect Guðjón Samuelsson was commissioned in 1937 to design Hallgrímskirkja, but the construction work didn’t begin until 1945 and ended 36 years later in 1986. It was designed to resemble the basalt lava flows in the Icelandic landscape. The church tower gives a magnificent view over Reykjavik city. Hallgrímskirkja is also well-known for its 5275 piped organ of the famous German brand, Orgelbau Klais.

is

The Water Library (Vatnasafn) displays a permanent installation that was designed by the American artist, Roni Horn in the old library in the coastal town, Stykkishólmur. On the main floor, a large room offers breathtaking views overlooking the sea and town and holds 24 glass columns containing water collected from some major glaciers around Iceland.

is

The new church of Stykkishólmur is a concrete building that was built in 1990. It stands on a promontory overlooking the town and can hold nearly 300 people. It was designed by the architect Jón Haraldsson and the church altar was painted by Kristín Gunnlaugsdottir. The church has excellent acoustics and hosts many concerts annually.

is

The gigantic sculpture Tvísöngur in Seyðisfjörður, east Iceland, was sculpted by the German artist, Lukas Kühne. Tvísöngur consists of five interconnected cement domes that resonate sound when the wind blows through them, creating a five-tone harmony (a musical tradition unique to Iceland).

Perlan is situated on the hill Öskjuhlíð, and serves as a hot water reserve to Reykjavík city, and is also a building that houses exhibitions, concerts, shops and restaurants. Perlan (25 meters high) is clearly recognisable on the Reykjavik skyline for its glass dome-shaped roof that offers stunning views of the Icelandic capital.

is

Skriðuklaustur is an old manor farm in the valley Fljótsdalur, in the east of Iceland, which was once a monastery from 1493 to 1552. In 1939, the writer Gunnar Gunnarsson bought the property and asked the German architect Fritz Höger to build a large house near the ruins of the cloister. When the writer moved to Reykjavík in 1948, he donated the house and land to the Icelandic nation. In 2000, the building became a cultural and historical centre open to visitors every summer.

is

The bizarre house of Icelandic film director, Hrafn Gunnlaugsson (located at Laugarnestangi 65, Reykjavík) is open for guided tours. With thirteen gates, this property is an array of strange works of art and sculptures made from metal, stones, rocks and recycled materials.

is

Iceland24
© All rights reserved

Strange architecture in Iceland! - What to see in Iceland